Pulaski County

Biography - B. L. Ulen

B. L. ULEN, Circuit Clerk, Mound City, born February 5, 1837, in Greenup City, Ky., son of Samuel Ulen, of German descent, born December 20, 1798, in Virginia, where he was a well-to-do farmer. He moved to Scotland County, Mo., when our subject was quite young. There he lost everything by a great overflow and was compelled to encamp with about 300 other families in a small gulch back of the river. While there the cholera broke out, destroying whole families. They moved back into the hills near Steward's mill, where they worked for very small wages, gathering property around them, and finally coming to Pulaski County, Ill., where he died April 6, 1866.

The mother of our subject was a native of Mason County, Ky., born November 1, 1810. She died July 14, 1866. Her maiden name was Margaret Thompson, and she was the mother of eight boys and four girls, of whom only five boys are now living, viz., Hamilton C., a farmer and merchant in Dexter, Mo.; Frederick G., a farmer near Ullin, Ill.; Matthew T., of Fort Laramie, Wy. Ter.; Thomas J., in partnership with his brother at Dexter, Mo., and Benjamin L., our subject, who went to school in this county to Col. E. B. Watkins, who was afterward a Representative. He then taught school two winters, and finally, through the kindness of Lieut. Gov. Dougherty, obtained a scholarship to the Anna High School, where he studied till October, 1861, when he enlisted in the Ninth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Company K, as private; from that, through his strict attention, ability and bravery, he was promoted to Corporal, Sergeant, Orderly Sergeant and finally Second Lieutenant. He participated in many thrilling scenes; was wounded twice, the last time in 1863, at Salem, Miss. He was finally mustered out in August, 1864, at Springfield, Ill.

After the war, he taught school for several years, and then in 1872, he was elected Circuit Clerk, filling the office with tact and ability to such an extent that he was re-elected twice. His majority in 1876 was 1,144 votes. In 1876, he was also appointed Master in Chancery by Judge John Dougherty, and re-appointed by Judge D. J. Baker. He also holds the office of Public Administrator, being appointed by Gov. Cullom. He is also Township Treasurer.

Mr. Ulen was joined in matrimony, October 26, 1867, in Jonesboro, Union County, Ill., to Miss Ella Herrick, born May 16, 1850, in Bangor, Me., where she was also educated. She is the mother of four children now living, viz., George A., born September 24, 1871; Eva Maude, November 29, 1874; Olive Grace, born October 25, 1880; Lottie B., born September 2, 1882. In 1863, she came West to join her parents, George R. and Mary C. (Nichols) Herrick. He was born May 10, 1812, in Hampden, Me. She was born in Nobleboro, Me. Although we deserve no credit nor are made better by what our parents have done, yet it is pleasant to know that our ancestors for centuries back have endeavored to hand down to posterity an untarnished name. The Herrick family is of English descent, although its progenitor was one Henry Eyryk, a lineal descendant of Eric the forester, a great commander, who opposed William the Conqueror. His grandson, Robert Eyryk, died in 1385. He was Chaplain to Edward, the Black Prince, LL. D., and finally Lord Bishop of Litchfield. The history of the Herrick family in the United States, commenced with Henerie Herrick, born in 1604, in England. He settled in Salem, June 24, 1629. The grandfather of Mrs. Ulen, Jedediah Herrick, settled in Hampden, Me., November 5, 1800, author of the Genealogical Register of the Herrick family, whose coat of arms is yet in existence.

Mr. and Mrs. Ulen are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is Chaplin of the I. O. O. F., is also a Good Templar and in politics a Republican. His office is in the same building in which he lay after he was wounded at the battle of Fort Donelson.

Extracted 02 Nov 2014 by Norma Hass from 1883 History of Alexander, Union and Pulaski Counties, Illinois, Part V - Biographical Sketches, pages 280-281.


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